The Outstanding Ohioans show, Episode 58-Conversation with Nick Petro, Life Coach/Speaker/Author/Owner of the Nick Petro Company

This show brings the audience great things Ohioans are doing to make their communities, the state, the region, and the world a better place as entrepreneurs, leaders, historical and popular culture figures.

For episode 58, I had the pleasure of speaking with Nick Petro, Life Coach/Speaker/Author and Owner of The Nick Petro Company. To connect with the Outstanding Ohioans show, here are a few ways:

Here were the topics we discussed in our conversation:

  • Growing up in Northeast Ohio
  • The role of his Dad and Mom in shaping his life
  • His journey on working with youth, his move to Encinitas, CA, and his current path
  • The inspirational story of his hero, his brother Corey
  • His other influences in life, such as Tony Robbins
  • Two pieces of advice working with youth-Earn the right to be heard, and Meet them where they are.
  • How he came up with the Seven Pillars as a framework and his process for writing the book
  • the importance of Legacy

Nick can be reached at his website nickpetrocompany.com

To help support the show, please shop on Amazon with this link.  I receive a small commission for any sales with no added expense to you.  Thank you for your support!

Thank you for taking the time to listen to the show.  Please leave a review on ITunes or Stitcher, or email me at ronsiliko@gmail.com.  Please refer any recommended future guests to my email.

 

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The Outstanding Ohioans show, Episode 56-Interview with Heather Shumaker, author of “It’s OK To Go Up The Slide”

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This show brings the audience great things Ohioans are doing to make their communities, the state, the region, and the world a better place as entrepreneurs, leaders, historical and popular culture figures.

For episode 56, I had the pleasure of speaking with Heather Shumaker, author of It’s OK to Go UP the Slide… Renegade Rules for Raising Confident and Creative Kids It’s OK NOT to Share… and Other Renegade Rules for Raising Competent and Compassionate Kids

To connect with the Outstanding Ohioans show, here are a few ways:

The two books that Heather Shumaker has written provide great insights and ideas on how to raise children to be responsible, creative human beings with the ability to communicate.  Many of her thoughts counter the current culture of overprotective parents & practices within the school system.

Here were the topics we discussed in our conversation:

  • growing up in Columbus, Ohio
  • the background of her mother and father, who both recently retired as educators
  • attending the School for Young Children, founded in 1969 in Columbus
  • why she structured specific tools & ideas in her books that parents could use
  • her two central parenting themes
  • street smarts and stranger danger
  • sharing
  • calendars & clocks
  • homework
  • recess
  • reading
  • conflict resolution
  • reading for pleasure vs. forced reading
  • technology temptation
  • kid evaluation/resolution vs. adult intervention
  • fairness & justice
  • establishing boundaries

Listeners can connect with Heather in the following ways:

Thank you for taking the time to listen to the show.  Please leave a review on ITunes or Stitcher, or email me at ronsiliko@gmail.com.  Please refer any recommended future guests to my email.

Own the Customer! Own YOUR Customer!

Customers are not always right, but they are the most important part of any business.  Without customers, there is no money to pay employees, no money to buy equipment, no money to pay the rent.  That’s obvious right?  If you are not making every decision, every idea, every thought with the customer in mind, you need to do it.

It is important to build up a bank account of goodwill with your customers for the day there is an issue to resolve (and if they are a frequent visitor, the day WILL COME).  How do you do this?

  • greet them and thank them for their business EVERY TIME they visit, even if they do not buy anything
  • use their name
  • try to find out the reason behind their purchase
  • remember or find out about their most recent purchase from you and how it is working out (remembering without asking is much more impressive!)
  • if they ask a question you don’t know the answer to, promise to find out the answer and then personally follow up with them, along with the name of the person who will follow up with them….DO NOT just pass them off to someone else
  • DO NOT blame a co-worker or supervisor…the customer does not care about your organization chart, they just want the issue resolved
  • return all phone calls and emails promptly (have an automated away message up with another contact person if you will be gone for an extended period of time)
  • take detailed messages if the customer wants to hear back on anything
  • simplify the process for the customer
  • provide tokens of appreciation for long-term business
  • listen to their complaints, get their contact information, and notify the customer of the resolution to address the complaint PERSONALLY
  • ask questions about their lives, ask questions about the benefits they receive from using your product/service
  • remember something from your last conversation and follow up on their next visit
  • send handwritten notes of recognition for special items, such as birthdays, job promotions, etc
  • if your organization cannot provide a requested service, recommend someone who can, even if they are a competitor
  • solve a problem the customer has

The best customer service staff do these things to develop connections and relationships with THEIR customers.  The biggest indicator that your staff are doing this is if the customer only wants to deal with that person, or asks to see them if that person is not serving them that visit.

Strive for this kind of ownership from your front-line staff, and watch your retention percentage soar.  See your satisfaction increase.

I would love to hear your customer service stories!

 

 

 

 

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Here are a couple of my most viewed posts.

Click here for my book review of Toughness:  Developing True Strength On and Off the Court by Jay Bilas

Click here for my book review of The Power of Negative Thinking by Bob Knight

Click here for my book review of Bo’s Lasting Lessons:  The Legendary Coach Teaches the Timeless Fundamentals of Leadership

Brothers should bunk

-I am the author of The Basketball Match Up Zone and Multi-Purpose Basketball Offense ebooks.

Blending realistic expectations with an uncommon sense of purpose and work ethic, taking care of your own business on the basketball court

I had the pleasure of taking Ryan and myself to my old high school to watch the Buckeye Lady Bucks (can there be Lady Bucks?) under the leadership of my old basketball coach Randy Haury.  I have done this the last three years whenever I have been in Litchfield visiting my parents during basketball season.  He has always been very gracious about letting me have some input into practice, which I appreciate tremendously.  I hope my input provides some value, and more importantly gives the players another voice to hear reinforce sound concepts.

I got a kick out of watching Ryan on the sidelines during the practice.  He was very animated and verbally into the action.  I did not understand everything he was saying, but I loved seeing the enthusiasm.  I enjoyed getting him into the athletic environment so he gets acclimated to what happens.

Coach Haury has a young team with low numbers of upperclass students and little varsity game experience.  An outstanding win/loss record may be difficult to achieve, but he is looking forward to the journey and the learning that will take place.  He believes if they can be successful fundamentally, they will have a chance to be very competitive.

During practice, I did some coaching on fundamental skills.  However, I thought the area for greatest improvement was in team communication.  The first thing I noticed during drill work was there was very little communication amongst teammates.  This team has NO chance to be competitive without positive basketball communication between teammates.  Communication is just as critical a skill as offense and defense, and in fact is the only constant on both ends of the floor.  The communication needs to be supportive and affirming, as well as tactical.

I think the team’s most talented player, Sara, has a chance to be an outstanding leader and solid player.  We had the discussion about being responsible for Sara being the team’s most competitive and hardest worker so she would have leadership credibility with her teammates.  She has a tough choice to make, be a nice teammate or a leader who may ruffle some feathers.  I hope she makes the leadership choice, I saw some good examples in practice that I really liked.

The communication aspect is really important for this team, because they need a sense of purpose and develop an exceptional practice work ethic so they are getting better everyday.  Improvement for game performance will not happen without this occurring.  This is a collective responsibility that needs to be embraced by those players committed to excellence.

I went to practice on a Saturday morning.  I am curious to see how many players picked up basketball AT ALL before practice on Monday afternoon.  How many players thought about the game?  The answer may provide some indication on the level of commitment the team currently has.

When a lack of win/loss success or lack of playing time, there becomes an immediate reaction that it must be the coach’s fault.  There is a serious lack of personal accountability within the players and parents when these issues arise.  I hope players can consult this list and see if they are doing these things before they begin to blame others.

What every basketball player can and cannot do

  • Did you make 100 game speed shots/day?
  • Are you in better cardio shape than anyone else?
  • Are you playing good defense, including help defense and boxing out?
  • Are you communicating on the floor?
  • Are you turning the ball over?
  • Are you pushing your teammates by going hard in every drill and scrimmage?
  • Are you pushing yourself hard, or pacing yourself during practice and games?
  • Are you making things easy or difficult for your opponent?
  • Are you trying to make things better yourself, or are you blaming others?

Being part of a team can be a great thing, or it can be a terrible thing.  My encouragement is to look inward to be personal accountable FIRST, walk the walk, and then you have the credibility to talk the talk.  Come from a position of strength and commitment.

I would love to hear your comments.

R

Book Review of “Toughness: Developing True Strength On And Off The Court by Jay Bilas

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Over the last few months, I have greatly enjoyed reading and re-reading the book “Toughness:  Developing True Strength On and Off the Court” by Jay Bilas.  While the book contains many, many great basketball stories, there are several other moving stories that demonstrate how mental toughness has led to amazing outcomes.  I shared in a recent blog post that I listened to this book with my son Ryan as we drove to Baltimore from Ohio.

In this blog post, I have linked my notes detailing key phrases and key concepts.  The anecdotes Bilas’s shares serve to amplify these notes in tremendous detail.  I have posted the Book notes in a Mindmap form below (see red links).  They will appear as PDF’s, and you will be able to enlarge the pictures as needed for reading.

If you are interesting in reading insights into Coach K from Duke, it’s in here.  Want to hear great stories about parenting….in here.  Want to hear courageous cancer battles with doctors, nurses, and patients as partners….it’s in here.  Stories about demanding teachers, mentors, and teammates….you guessed it.

If you are looking for tips that you can use personally for a more rewarding and productive life, or in your mentoring of others, I highly recommend this book.  If you are a sports fan and are curious how success happens behind the scenes, you will love this content.

Click here to see my notes on the INTRODUCTION section of the book.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter One, “TRUST”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Two, “PREPARATION”, part one.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Two, “PREPARATION”, part two.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Three, “COURAGE”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Four, “COMMUNICATION”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Five, “PERSISTENCE”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Six, “NEXT PLAY”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Seven, “COMMITMENT”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Eight, “ACCEPTANCE”,  part one.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Eight, “ACCEPTANCE”, part two.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Eight, “ACCEPTANCE”, part three.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Nine, “RESILIENCE”.

Click here to see my notes on Chapter Ten, “SELF-EVALUATION”.

Click here to see my notes on the EPILOGUE

If you have enjoyed reading my notes, you can get the hardcover or paperback version of the book, click here.  For Kindle, click here.

Please connect with me on TwitterFacebook, or my YouTube channel.

Go here to listen to my podcast “Outstanding Ohioans” and like on Facebook.

To purchase my Kindle version of Basketball’s Multi-Purpose Offense:  The Open Post Motion Offense, the 1-4 High Offense, and High Post Offense.

To purchase my E-book on my Basketball Ball Match Up Zone Defense, click here.

To purchase my E-book on Basketball’s Multi-Purpose Offense:  The Open Post Motion Offense, the 1-4 High Offense, and the High Post Offense, click here.

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Here are a couple of my most viewed posts.

Click here for my book review of Toughness:  Developing True Strength On and Off the Court by Jay Bilas

Click here for my book review of The Power of Negative Thinking by Bob Knight

Click here for my book review of Bo’s Lasting Lessons:  The Legendary Coach Teaches the Timeless Fundamentals of Leadership

Brothers should bunk